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Ultimate Benefactor

Posts: 3,502 Member Since: 03/31/14


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06/22/15 4:27 AM

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Huckabee - punts

Santorum - punts

Romney - take it down

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 

Donald Trump got 62,985,106 votes. Hillary Clinton only got 65,853,625 votes.

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not2serious

Posts: 7,693 Member Since:03/07/14
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#1 [url]

06/22/15 5:04 AM

It is just a flag. It is just a symbol. Nothing more, nothing less.

It is simply a jab at federal authority, which is growing every day despite our foundings on a constitution, that was clearly formed with LIMITED GOVERNMENT. I don't have a copy of it in my possession, but others have every right to it, even flying it at the capitol of a state.

Politicians are just clowns. Romney threw the election for president, and he is throwing all libertarians and right wing people under the bus now over the flag.

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Morticia Addams

Posts: 2,740 Member Since:04/30/14

#2 [url]

06/22/15 6:18 AM

From the late 1980s until Hurrican Katrina struck we lived in New Orleans small metro area. When we first moved there people would jokingly be puzzled why we moved there as everybody else had been moving away. Starting with 'Dutch' Morial in the early 1980s, New Orleans black mayors were a grubby, grabby lot. When we moved there (we had the sense to buy a home in close in Metairie, Jefferson Parish, not New Orleans city limits) Sidney Barthelomy was mayor. These 'Creole' politicians consolidated their power by dispensing spoils and keeping the underclass riled with fake issues. One typical issue was the City Council prez, Dorothy Mae Taylor's crusade to forcibly integrate the Mardi Gras private clubs (known as 'krewes', a term which some of you Scotch Irish might know) which presented themselves in the 2 week long festival of pre-Lenten Carnival parades . The whole concept of these annual parades comes down from the ancient Roman Republic! smiley: smile

Old time prominent Carnival Krewes in NOLA (not Metairie which had its own krewes and parades!)  included Rex, Comus, and many more. The members of the krewes were businessmen and professionals of all kinds who had the money to pay fairly high dues. My friend Vince was in the krewe of Momus. Momus was primarily a club of physicians and other medical professionals. Our Congressman Bob Livingston was in it too.

 On the whole members of the krewes retained anonyminity and masked on the floats, even at their balls, except for the 'Kings' whose identities were revealed on the nights or days they paraded. A krewe which wasn't as anonymous was Bacchus, which for decades had invited national celebrities to 'rule' as their parade 'Kings'. Among the Bacchus kings who'd gladly come to participate in the Carnival festivities were more Hollywood stars and comedians than I can list. Most important to remember about these krewes whose efforts made NOLA's Mardi Gras parades a world famous annual event was the parades were funded and directed by members. There were no 'corporate sponsorships' allowed.

The floats, Krewe balls and other accoutrement of the celebrations weren't cheap.  The black community had one big krewe called 'Zulu' which went back to the 1940s, I think. Other than that they participated in Carnival festivities with music, marching clubs and the krewes of feathered and beaded 'Mardi Gras Indians'. :) Black parading groups often 'couldn't get it together'. After the Civil Rights ruckus the 1960s-1970s Zulu krewes bullied the Carnival organising and planning committee to allow Zulu's parade to precede that of august, ancient Rex on Fat Tuesday. As usual black demands won out.

Well, 20 years later some of the the higher up blacks hadn't started any krewes themselves. They demanded to be admitted to the old timey prestigious krewes. But please understand these krewes go back to the 19th century and like any really good clubs if you have to ask or push to be admitted, then the membership wouldn't want anything to do with you. There were two prestigious ladies parading krewes too! :) (You should have seen me in 1990 wearing a grand satin Martha Washington costume for a Revolutionary War parade theme. )

So, Councilwoman Dorothy Mae Taylor, a nasty near useless NOLA troublemaker forwarded the agenda to 'desegregate' the krewes. She and other fools claimed city roads, police, and civic accommodations somehow meant the carnival clubs should be open to the public. That men's krewes should be forced to admit women. Let's try to remember that the largesse of private krewes in mounting the grand parades happened to be the goose laying golden eggs which brought in millions of tourists through many decades!

Nearly all the parade krewes and most of the public protested Taylor's efforts to destroy the krewes. We all saw exactly what she and her patrons wanted. They knew if the krewes surrendered the blacks could easily take over maybe even control krewes by obtaining sponsorships or grants for membership dues from corporations, or NGOs. Should corporations become involved through sponsorships, they would choose the parade themes, plaster logos all over once lovely floats. The timeless artfully magical Mardi Gras floats would begin to resemble NASCAR racing cars. The themes of floats and float riders costumes might be dictated to exclude any controversial or satyrical content.

The Krewe of Momus (a god of comedy), including Dr. Vince and Bob Livingston (both being among 300 'secret' members)  most protested and fought Taylor's  'equal opportunity' legislation. Of course the Leftist professors of Tulane and Xavier universities supported all schemes to bust into private clubs, the bastion of white privilege. Somehow they imagined they had a right to intrude into and take over what they did not create, even though through the decades nobody ever put anything in their way to prevent them from forming parading krewes and commissioning their own floats and holding balls. ('Mardi Gras' is big business in the area. There are several major float builders, costume designers and makers, etc.) BTW, Dorothy Mae Taylor's Carnival 'civil rights' legislation was passed by the council. Momus was the first krewe  disband rather than abide governmental authority. :(


The attempts by ignorant leftists to obliterate historical artifacts reminded me of the surrender of the Krewes. Councilwoman Dorothy Mae Taylor and some of her repulsive constituents next turned their attention to removing or destroying the great post-Confederate monuments of New Orleans, including the statue of General Robert E. Lee in the middle of Lee Circle. I despise people who seek to destroy history. It's akin to destroying truth. smiley: mad

Last Edited By: Morticia Addams 06/22/15 6:21 AM. Edited 1 time.

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Morticia Addams

Posts: 2,740 Member Since:04/30/14

#5 [url]

06/22/15 8:26 AM

Five facts about the Confederate Flag:

http://allenwestrepublic.com/2015/06/20/five-important-facts-you-did-not-know-about-this-flag/

Excerpt:

  1. The Confederate Battle Flag was never a National Flag of the Confederacy. It was carried into battle by several armies such as the Army Of Northern Virginia and the Army of Tennessee. It was also used as a Naval Jack by the Confederate Navy.

  1.  The Battle Flag was not called the Stars and Bars. It was called the Southern Cross.

  1.  The original Battle Flag design was a square flag and not a rectangle.

square flag design

 

  1.  No Confederate flag was ever flown on a slave ship.  English, Dutch, Portuguese, and the New England States ships were used in the slave trade.

This article was created by Paul Clark and Tanya Grimsley (NOT ALLEN WEST)


It is necessary to disclaim any connection of these flags to neo-nazis, red-necks, skin-heads and the like. These groups have usurped this flag and desecrated it by their acts. They have no moral right to use this flag – it is a flag of honor, designed by the confederacy to distinguish itself from the Union  .

In fact, under attack, it still flies over the South Carolina capitol building. The South denies any relation to these hate groups and denies them the right to use the flags of the confederacy for any purpose. The crimes committed by these groups under the stolen banner of the confederacy only exacerbate the lies which link the secession to slavery interests when, from a Southerner’s view, the cause was to distinguish itself from the Union.

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#6 [url]

06/22/15 8:58 AM

I will share my father's point of view, which I don't necessarily disagree with... "Why would you want to fly the flag of a bunch of LOSERS. It doesn't say much about YOU, does it?" -------------- I identify with LOSERS. I want to be a LOSER, too! --------------- It ain't pretty, but it's to the point. Lol

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Revo1ting

Posts: 1,050 Member Since:05/29/15

#7 [url]

06/22/15 11:17 AM

I have no problem with the Confederate flag BUT it does irritate a lot of people.

It's a relic of the past and a lost cause.

It has come to be associated with slavery not states rights.

Does it really need to be flying over any American state capitol building today?

It has a place like museums and Civil War battle re-enactments.

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1ArizonaMan

Posts: 3,654 Member Since:03/10/14

Have goatee and attitude
will travel

#9 [url]

06/22/15 12:38 PM

Morticia Addams wrote:
From the late 1980s until Hurrican Katrina struck we lived in New Orleans small metro area. When we first moved there people would jokingly be puzzled why we moved there as everybody else had been moving away. Starting with 'Dutch' Morial in the early 1980s, New Orleans black mayors were a grubby, grabby lot. When we moved there (we had the sense to buy a home in close in Metairie, Jefferson Parish, not New Orleans city limits) Sidney Barthelomy was mayor. These 'Creole' politicians consolidated their power by dispensing spoils and keeping the underclass riled with fake issues. One typical issue was the City Council prez, Dorothy Mae Taylor's crusade to forcibly integrate the Mardi Gras private clubs (known as 'krewes', a term which some of you Scotch Irish might know) which presented themselves in the 2 week long festival of pre-Lenten Carnival parades . The whole concept of these annual parades comes down from the ancient Roman Republic! smiley: smile

Old time prominent Carnival Krewes in NOLA (not Metairie which had its own krewes and parades!)  included Rex, Comus, and many more. The members of the krewes were businessmen and professionals of all kinds who had the money to pay fairly high dues. My friend Vince was in the krewe of Momus. Momus was primarily a club of physicians and other medical professionals. Our Congressman Bob Livingston was in it too.

 On the whole members of the krewes retained anonyminity and masked on the floats, even at their balls, except for the 'Kings' whose identities were revealed on the nights or days they paraded. A krewe which wasn't as anonymous was Bacchus, which for decades had invited national celebrities to 'rule' as their parade 'Kings'. Among the Bacchus kings who'd gladly come to participate in the Carnival festivities were more Hollywood stars and comedians than I can list. Most important to remember about these krewes whose efforts made NOLA's Mardi Gras parades a world famous annual event was the parades were funded and directed by members. There were no 'corporate sponsorships' allowed.

The floats, Krewe balls and other accoutrement of the celebrations weren't cheap.  The black community had one big krewe called 'Zulu' which went back to the 1940s, I think. Other than that they participated in Carnival festivities with music, marching clubs and the krewes of feathered and beaded 'Mardi Gras Indians'. :) Black parading groups often 'couldn't get it together'. After the Civil Rights ruckus the 1960s-1970s Zulu krewes bullied the Carnival organising and planning committee to allow Zulu's parade to precede that of august, ancient Rex on Fat Tuesday. As usual black demands won out.

Well, 20 years later some of the the higher up blacks hadn't started any krewes themselves. They demanded to be admitted to the old timey prestigious krewes. But please understand these krewes go back to the 19th century and like any really good clubs if you have to ask or push to be admitted, then the membership wouldn't want anything to do with you. There were two prestigious ladies parading krewes too! :) (You should have seen me in 1990 wearing a grand satin Martha Washington costume for a Revolutionary War parade theme. )

So, Councilwoman Dorothy Mae Taylor, a nasty near useless NOLA troublemaker forwarded the agenda to 'desegregate' the krewes. She and other fools claimed city roads, police, and civic accommodations somehow meant the carnival clubs should be open to the public. That men's krewes should be forced to admit women. Let's try to remember that the largesse of private krewes in mounting the grand parades happened to be the goose laying golden eggs which brought in millions of tourists through many decades!

Nearly all the parade krewes and most of the public protested Taylor's efforts to destroy the krewes. We all saw exactly what she and her patrons wanted. They knew if the krewes surrendered the blacks could easily take over maybe even control krewes by obtaining sponsorships or grants for membership dues from corporations, or NGOs. Should corporations become involved through sponsorships, they would choose the parade themes, plaster logos all over once lovely floats. The timeless artfully magical Mardi Gras floats would begin to resemble NASCAR racing cars. The themes of floats and float riders costumes might be dictated to exclude any controversial or satyrical content.

The Krewe of Momus (a god of comedy), including Dr. Vince and Bob Livingston (both being among 300 'secret' members)  most protested and fought Taylor's  'equal opportunity' legislation. Of course the Leftist professors of Tulane and Xavier universities supported all schemes to bust into private clubs, the bastion of white privilege. Somehow they imagined they had a right to intrude into and take over what they did not create, even though through the decades nobody ever put anything in their way to prevent them from forming parading krewes and commissioning their own floats and holding balls. ('Mardi Gras' is big business in the area. There are several major float builders, costume designers and makers, etc.) BTW, Dorothy Mae Taylor's Carnival 'civil rights' legislation was passed by the council. Momus was the first krewe  disband rather than abide governmental authority. :(


The attempts by ignorant leftists to obliterate historical artifacts reminded me of the surrender of the Krewes. Councilwoman Dorothy Mae Taylor and some of her repulsive constituents next turned their attention to removing or destroying the great post-Confederate monuments of New Orleans, including the statue of General Robert E. Lee in the middle of Lee Circle. I despise people who seek to destroy history. It's akin to destroying truth. smiley: mad

Did all the Krewes disband? And what has happened to NOLA Mardi Gras since then?

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the dowie

Posts: 4,444 Member Since:01/14/15

#11 [url]

06/22/15 4:17 PM

I'm Dowie, and I love all Americans, including the fine people from the South. 

The secret of the demagogue is to make himself as stupid as his audience so they believe they are clever as he.  Karl Kraus

Last Edited By: cydoniaquest 06/22/15 11:06 PM. Edited 1 time.

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not2serious

Posts: 7,693 Member Since:03/07/14
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#14 [url]

06/22/15 5:14 PM

think the Stars and Bars should be taken down and placed in a museum or used for Civil War reenactments. 

I think it should be taken down, shove up your ass, and lit on fire! smiley: laugh

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Morticia Addams

Posts: 2,740 Member Since:04/30/14

#15 [url]

06/22/15 5:28 PM

the dowie wrote:
It should be ripped down, dipped in acid, and inserted in your racist fucking asses

Whoever you are, your vocabulary conveys your level of intelligence.

Cydonia, personally I am repelled by posts offering nothing but senseless profanity combined with aggressive attacks. This kind of thing is obvious trolling.smiley: wink

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LegalAmerican

Posts: 17,686 Member Since:06/07/15

#16 [url]

06/22/15 5:37 PM

Morticia Addams wrote:
From the late 1980s until Hurrican Katrina struck we lived in New Orleans small metro area. When we first moved there people would jokingly be puzzled why we moved there as everybody else had been moving away. Starting with 'Dutch' Morial in the early 1980s, New Orleans black mayors were a grubby, grabby lot. When we moved there (we had the sense to buy a home in close in Metairie, Jefferson Parish, not New Orleans city limits) Sidney Barthelomy was mayor. These 'Creole' politicians consolidated their power by dispensing spoils and keeping the underclass riled with fake issues. One typical issue was the City Council prez, Dorothy Mae Taylor's crusade to forcibly integrate the Mardi Gras private clubs (known as 'krewes', a term which some of you Scotch Irish might know) which presented themselves in the 2 week long festival of pre-Lenten Carnival parades . The whole concept of these annual parades comes down from the ancient Roman Republic! smiley: smile

Old time prominent Carnival Krewes in NOLA (not Metairie which had its own krewes and parades!)  included Rex, Comus, and many more. The members of the krewes were businessmen and professionals of all kinds who had the money to pay fairly high dues. My friend Vince was in the krewe of Momus. Momus was primarily a club of physicians and other medical professionals. Our Congressman Bob Livingston was in it too.

 On the whole members of the krewes retained anonyminity and masked on the floats, even at their balls, except for the 'Kings' whose identities were revealed on the nights or days they paraded. A krewe which wasn't as anonymous was Bacchus, which for decades had invited national celebrities to 'rule' as their parade 'Kings'. Among the Bacchus kings who'd gladly come to participate in the Carnival festivities were more Hollywood stars and comedians than I can list. Most important to remember about these krewes whose efforts made NOLA's Mardi Gras parades a world famous annual event was the parades were funded and directed by members. There were no 'corporate sponsorships' allowed.

The floats, Krewe balls and other accoutrement of the celebrations weren't cheap.  The black community had one big krewe called 'Zulu' which went back to the 1940s, I think. Other than that they participated in Carnival festivities with music, marching clubs and the krewes of feathered and beaded 'Mardi Gras Indians'. :) Black parading groups often 'couldn't get it together'. After the Civil Rights ruckus the 1960s-1970s Zulu krewes bullied the Carnival organising and planning committee to allow Zulu's parade to precede that of august, ancient Rex on Fat Tuesday. As usual black demands won out.

Well, 20 years later some of the the higher up blacks hadn't started any krewes themselves. They demanded to be admitted to the old timey prestigious krewes. But please understand these krewes go back to the 19th century and like any really good clubs if you have to ask or push to be admitted, then the membership wouldn't want anything to do with you. There were two prestigious ladies parading krewes too! :) (You should have seen me in 1990 wearing a grand satin Martha Washington costume for a Revolutionary War parade theme. )

So, Councilwoman Dorothy Mae Taylor, a nasty near useless NOLA troublemaker forwarded the agenda to 'desegregate' the krewes. She and other fools claimed city roads, police, and civic accommodations somehow meant the carnival clubs should be open to the public. That men's krewes should be forced to admit women. Let's try to remember that the largesse of private krewes in mounting the grand parades happened to be the goose laying golden eggs which brought in millions of tourists through many decades!

Nearly all the parade krewes and most of the public protested Taylor's efforts to destroy the krewes. We all saw exactly what she and her patrons wanted. They knew if the krewes surrendered the blacks could easily take over maybe even control krewes by obtaining sponsorships or grants for membership dues from corporations, or NGOs. Should corporations become involved through sponsorships, they would choose the parade themes, plaster logos all over once lovely floats. The timeless artfully magical Mardi Gras floats would begin to resemble NASCAR racing cars. The themes of floats and float riders costumes might be dictated to exclude any controversial or satyrical content.

The Krewe of Momus (a god of comedy), including Dr. Vince and Bob Livingston (both being among 300 'secret' members)  most protested and fought Taylor's  'equal opportunity' legislation. Of course the Leftist professors of Tulane and Xavier universities supported all schemes to bust into private clubs, the bastion of white privilege. Somehow they imagined they had a right to intrude into and take over what they did not create, even though through the decades nobody ever put anything in their way to prevent them from forming parading krewes and commissioning their own floats and holding balls. ('Mardi Gras' is big business in the area. There are several major float builders, costume designers and makers, etc.) BTW, Dorothy Mae Taylor's Carnival 'civil rights' legislation was passed by the council. Momus was the first krewe  disband rather than abide governmental authority. :(


The attempts by ignorant leftists to obliterate historical artifacts reminded me of the surrender of the Krewes. Councilwoman Dorothy Mae Taylor and some of her repulsive constituents next turned their attention to removing or destroying the great post-Confederate monuments of New Orleans, including the statue of General Robert E. Lee in the middle of Lee Circle. I despise people who seek to destroy history. It's akin to destroying truth. smiley: mad

Totally right on, destroying  all of our American heritage and getting ready for the muslim one.
Based on the muslim hate, (starting with obma)  we should get RID OF ANYTHING TO DO WITH MUSLIMS.  Makes as much sense.

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LegalAmerican

Posts: 17,686 Member Since:06/07/15

#17 [url]

06/22/15 5:38 PM

Morticia Addams wrote:
Nana, thank you, dear angel. A92155c91e4a55382f8e43f4faee6b06ecda68e_r

I was afraid I'd bore everybody to tears.

No, not the RIGHT.  We like real information and actually READ IT!

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LegalAmerican

Posts: 17,686 Member Since:06/07/15

#18 [url]

06/22/15 5:50 PM

not2serious wrote:

think the Stars and Bars should be taken down and placed in a museum or used for Civil War reenactments. 

I think it should be taken down, shove up your ass, and lit on fire! smiley: laugh


I agree, all anti American people ,living in America need to be moved to a muslim country or a communist one..then , THEY MIGHT get a clue.  Their posts are SHOWING,  real MENTAL ILLNESS .

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the dowie

Posts: 4,444 Member Since:01/14/15

#19 [url]

06/22/15 5:51 PM

LegalAmerican wrote:


Totally right on, destroying  all of our American heritage and getting ready for the muslim one.




smiley: roll

The secret of the demagogue is to make himself as stupid as his audience so they believe they are clever as he.  Karl Kraus

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Morticia Addams

Posts: 2,740 Member Since:04/30/14

#20 [url]

06/22/15 7:33 PM

Here it comes, as I predicted, the move to destroy historical monuments. Destroy a people's history to replace it with what?

I've long believed part of the animosity against artfully sculpted monuments is based in the inability of present day 'artists' to create bronze or stone sculptures of beauty. John Scott, the NOLA sculptor who supposedly said the statues of the past made him 'sick to his stomach ', was a barely competent affirmative action hack incapable of excellent sculpting.

Similar envy of accomplishments lie behind the Muslim hatred of representational art forms.


http://www.nola.com/opinions/index.ssf/2015/06/confederate_flag_carolina.html

Excerpt:

As Confederate flag loses support, Mayor Landrieu keys in on Confederate monuments: Jarvis DeBerry

New Orleans Circle for Mike Brown
Circle for Mike Brown solidarity rally in support of the Ferguson youth killed, hosted by the Black Youth Project 100 NOLA takes place on Sunday November 30, 2014. Carrying signs and placards bearing the message "Black Lives Matter," protesters decrying police aggression staged a rally Sunday at Lee Circle and peacefully completed a 11/2-mile march to Congo Square. (KATHLEEN FLYNN, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Jarvis DeBerry, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune By Jarvis DeBerry, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune
Email the author | Follow on Twitter
on June 22, 2015 at 6:21 PM, updated June 22, 2015 at 6:53 PM

Nikky Haley, governor of South Carolina, reversed course Monday and said she thinks that the Confederate battle flag should be removed from its place of prominence on the grounds of the state capitol in Columbia. After Dylann Storm Roof, a 21-year-old white supremacist killed nine people in a Charleston church Wednesday, the pressure to take down the flag became too much for Haley to fight.

That flag, a symbol of hate and racism, doesn't fly over any government offices in New Orleans. But we still have many monuments to the Confederacy.

The most prominent one is certainly the statue to Robert E. Lee that towers over Lee Circle. Mayor Mitch Landrieu has been talking about whether the Lee monument ought to have a future as New Orleans approaches its 300th birthday.

Here's what Landrieu's office said Monday afternoon: "Mayor Landrieu has discussed with 2018 Tricentennial Commission members how we can appropriately recognize our 300-year history as a city while also looking to the future and helping New Orleans become the city we always knew she could be. Part of this process should include a close examination of the historical symbols throughout our city and what changes could be made as we approach 2018, including the Robert E. Lee statute in Lee Circle. These symbols say who we were in a particular time, but times change. Yet these symbols – statues, monuments, street names, and more – still influence who we are and how we are perceived by the world.  Mayor Landrieu believes it is time to look at the symbols in this city to see if they still have relevance to our future."


Last Edited By: Morticia Addams 06/22/15 7:41 PM. Edited 2 times.

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